Coping tips for COVID-19. Read more here.

Let’s just acknowledge it. Your pain is real.

Its impact on you is real.

Even if no one can see it. It’s an added pressure that you contend with. Day in. Day out.

Showing up for the mandatory things in your life is so, so hard.

Showing up and really being present, with your mind, for everything else is almost impossible.

What remains of the day is not enough time and energy for fun. For revitalizing relaxation. Not enough of the real you for loved ones.

Not enough energy for activities that truly nourish you. Not enough of you to go around.

Causing extra stress. The pressure further impacting your pain. All the while trying to put on an “I’m okay” face.

Your pain can lead to feeling isolated. To feeling misunderstood.

On the job. At home. And every place in between.

This isolation can bring on depression, anxiety, and even more pain. Your pain touches every aspect of your life. Like a domino effect.

The pain sets off a chain reaction, causing physical, emotional, and behavioral challenges, all ultimately increasing greatly your chance for an increased level of physical pain.

Pain.
Lack of Sleep.
Inflammation.
Increased Pain.
Irritability.
Fatigue.
Muddled thinking.
Poor problem solving.
Subpar performance.
Interpersonal conflict.
Stress.
Anxiety. Depression.
More Physical Pain.

But you can break the cycle

While psychotherapy may not take away all your pain, it will help you make changes in your life.

Changes to your routine. Changes to your pain-related thoughts. Changes to your life circumstances.

Together, we’ll begin peeling the extra layers of pain away. Minimizing your pain. Making it more bearable.

We’ll take a good look at all the factors in your life that are adding to your pain.

Your schedule. Expectations that you place on yourself. Your ability to say “no” to others. Lifestyle elements such as food, physical activity, self-care.

Our goal? Better days. More better days than you have now.

More times in your day, in your week, that you feel like yourself.

So that when you say, “I’m okay,” the words are effortless, and you mean it.